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Full text of "Poland Russia and Great Britain 1941-1945"

Agreement of July 30, or, in some cases, the local authorities were content
to deal with the matter in a purely pro for ma way, or with a partial execution
of the orders issued. It is to be assumed that various considerations have
dictated this treatment and in some instances local authorities may have
desired to secure for themselves virtually unpaid man-power, whence the
tendency to release sometimes elderly, invalid or ailing persons, while the
stronger and healthier are retained for compulsory labour.
... 1 also venture to draw your attention, Mr. Commissar, to the fact
that the organization of the Polish Army in the U.S.S.R, is not progressing
in accordance with the letter and spirit of the Agreement of July 30, 1941,
or with the intentions of the two Governments.
The Supreme Command of the Polish armed forces in the U.S.S.R. has
vainly waited four weeks for a decision on the formation of further Polish
divisions and the designation of the localities in which this formation is to
take place. In consequence, numerous Polish citizens reporting for military
service and rallying en masse to the Polish army stream into the two already
overcrowded camps, which lack the necessary number of tents, adequate
food supplies and medicines. Thus a situation, harmful alike to the troops
and to the common cause, is being created. The local administrative
authorities very often do not carry out the instructions issued by the central
authorities with regard to questions concerning the Polish Army and create
new additional difficulties, as for instance by declining to release from
prisons and camps all Polish citizens, military and reservists, and in many
instances by detaining the more physically fit elements, which reduces the
military value of the units already formed. Moreover, considerable
numbers of Polish citizens enrolled in the Red Army and subsequently
transferred to the so-called labour battalions have not up till now been
directed to the Polish Army.
EXCERPT OF THE NOTE OF OCTOBER 15, 1941, FROM
GENERAL WLADYSLAW SIKORSKI TO AMBASSADOR BOGO-
MOLOV, IN LONDON, CONCERNING THE FAILURE TO
RELEASE A CERTAIN NUMBER OF POLISH OFFICERS FROM
SOVIET PRISONER OF WAR CAMPS.
May I request Your Excellency to convey to the Soviet Government
the assurance that the Polish Government appreciates the good will shown
by the Soviet Government in carrying out the Polish-Soviet Agreement
of July 30, 1941. However, certain difficulties have become apparent
which do not seem to have any connection with those arising from military
operations. Thus the immediate release of Polish citizens deprived of
their freedom appears necessary in view of the approaching winter, as well
as means of assuring their existence. The fate of several thousand Polish
officers who have not returned to Poland and who have not been found in
Soviet military camps, continues to remain uncertain. They are probably
dispersed in the Northern districts of the U.S.S.R. Their presence in
Polish Army camps is indispensable.
May I also request Your Excellency to draw the attention of the Soviet
Government to the necessity of increasing the aid essential to the formation
and development of this Army.
EXCERPT OF THE NOTE OF NOVEMBER 14, 1941, FROM
AMBASSADOR BOGOMOLOV TO GENERAL SIKORSKI, IN
REPLY TO THE NOTE OF OCTOBER 16, 1941.
In reply to your Note of October 16, 1941,1 am instructed by the Soviet
Government to inform you, Mr. Prime Minister, that all Polish citizens to
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